EconStor >
Humboldt-Universität Berlin >
Sonderforschungsbereich 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes, Humboldt-Universität Berlin >
Discussion Papers, SFB 373, HU Berlin >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/61734
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWulff, Christianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-30T15:04:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-30T15:04:31Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-10046293en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/61734-
dc.description.abstractAlthough stock splits seem to be a purely cosmetic event, there exists ample empirical evidence from the United States that stock splits are associated with abnormal returns on both the announcement and the execution day, and additionally with an increase in variance following the ex-day. This paper investigates the market reaction to stock splits using a set of German firms. Consistent with the U.S. findings, similar effects are observed for the sample of German stock splits. Institutional differences between Germany and the U.S. allow to disentangle the three main hypotheses on the announcement effect - signalling, liquidity, and neglected firm hypothesis - to gain further insights into their relative explanation power. This paper argues that legal restrictions strongly limit the ability of German companies to use a stock split for signaling. Consistently, abnormal returns around the announcement day are much lower in Germany than in the U.S. Although a significant increase in liquidity can be found after the split crosssectional tests do not lend any support to the hypothesis that price changes are positively related to liquidity changes. This is in contrast to the results of Muscarella/Vetsuypens (1996) and Amihud/Mendelson/Lauterbach (1997). The paper shows that the announcement effect to German stock splits is best explained by a neglected firm effect. On the methodological side the effect of thin trading on event study results is examined. Using tradeto-trade returns increases the significance of abnormal returns but the difference between alternative return measurement methods is relatively small in short event periods. Thus, the observed market reaction cannot be attributed to measurement problems caused by thin trading.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität Berlinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Papers, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes 1999,42en_US
dc.subject.jelG14en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleThe market reaction to stock splits: Evidence from Germanyen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn722275811en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:sfb373:199942-
Appears in Collections:Discussion Papers, SFB 373, HU Berlin

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
722275811.pdf176.85 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.