EconStor >
Deutsches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW), Berlin >
DIW Economic Bulletin >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/61214
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBrenke, Karlen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-27en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T12:46:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T12:46:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationDIW Economic Bulletin 2192-7219 2 2012 7 1-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/61214-
dc.description.abstractThere has been no robust growth of the low-pay sector in Germany since 2006. Over the past few years, a constant 22 percent of all employees have fallen into this category. The job structure within the low-pay sector has not changed in the last decade. In the economy as a whole, however, there has been less and less demand for low-skilled work, which is increasingly becoming concentrated in the low-pay sector. The low-pay sector include many people in part-time and, in particular, marginal employment. Only half of them are in full-time employment. As a result of low hourly rates, they accept long working hours so as to be able to earn a reasonable living. Those in full-time employment in the low-pay sector work an average of almost 45 hours a week, and a quarter of them 50 hours or more. However, this does not go very far towards compensating for the disparity between their pay and average monthly earnings. Working hours comparable to those of low-wage earners are otherwise only seen at the top end of the pay scale, in other words, among high earners in full-time employment. The majority of part-time workers, particularly those with mini-jobs would like to work more and earn more; a hidden underemployment is evident here. Working in the low-pay sector does not automatically or normally go hand in hand with social welfare benefits; only one in eight of low earners are Hartz IV benefit recipients. The proportion of people in full-time employment in the low-pay sector is particularly small; they only claim state benefits if they have to provide for a larger family. And only a minority of low-wage earners in part-time work or with mini-jobs receive social welfare benefits. There are normally other people living in their household who are in employment, or there is another source of income such as a pension or private support payments.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherDeutsches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW) Berlinen_US
dc.subject.jelJ31en_US
dc.subject.jelJ81en_US
dc.subject.jelJ42en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordlow-pay sectoren_US
dc.subject.keywordworking hoursen_US
dc.subject.keywordsocial welfare benefitsen_US
dc.titleLong hours for low payen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.ppn720233631en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des DIW
DIW Economic Bulletin

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
720233631.pdf251.52 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.