EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of New York >
Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/60916
  
Title:Stereotypes and madrassas: Experimental evidence from Pakistan PDF Logo
Authors:Delavande, Adeline
Zafar, Basit
Issue Date:2011
Series/Report no.:Staff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 501
Abstract:Madrassas (Islamic religious seminaries) have been alleged to be responsible for fostering Islamic extremism and violence, and for indoctrinating their students in narrow worldviews. However, we know very little about the behavior of Madrassa students, and how other groups in their communities interact with them. To investigate this, we use unique experimental and survey data that we collected in Madrassas and other educational institutions in Pakistan. We randomly match male students from institutions of three distinct religious tendencies and socioeconomic background - Madrassas, Islamic Universities, and Liberal Universities - and observe their actions in several experiments of economic decision-making. First, we find a high level of trust among all groups, with students enrolled at Madrassas being the most trusting and exhibiting the highest level of unconditional other-regarding behavior. Second, within each group, we fail to find evidence of in-group bias or systematic out-group bias either in trust or tastes. These findings cast doubt on the general perception that Madrassas teach hatred and narrow worldviews. Third, we find that students of Liberal Universities underestimate the trustworthiness of Madrassa students, suggesting that an important segment of the society has mistaken stereotypes about students in religious seminaries.
Subjects:trust
group identity
religious seminaries
unconditional other-regarding behavior
expectations
JEL:C90
C70
Z12
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
663973996.pdf452.25 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/60916

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.