EconStor >
Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin >
Berlin Institute for International Political Economy (IPE), Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin >
IPE Working Papers, Institute for International Political Economy, HWR Berlin >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59308
  
Title:America's exhausted paradigm: Macroeconomic causes of the financial crisis and great recession PDF Logo
Authors:Palley, Thomas I.
Issue Date:2009
Series/Report no.:Working Paper, Institute for International Political Economy Berlin 02/2009
Abstract:This paper traces the roots of the current financial crisis to a faulty U.S. macroeconomic paradigm. One flaw in this paradigm was the neo-liberal growth model adopted after 1980 that relied on debt and asset price inflation to drive demand in place of wage growth. A second flaw was the model of U.S. engagement with the global economy that created a triple economic hemorrhage of spending on imports, manufacturing job losses, and off-shoring of investment. Financial deregulation and financial excess are important parts of the story, but they are not the ultimate cause of the crisis. These developments contributed significantly to the housing bubble but they were a necessary part of the neoliberal model, their function being to fuel demand growth by making ever larger amounts of credit easily available. As the neoliberal model slowly cannibalized itself by undermining income distribution and accumulating debt, the economy needed larger speculative bubbles to grow. The flawed model of global engagement accelerated the cannibalization process, thereby creating need for a huge bubble that only housing could provide. However, when that bubble burst it pulled down the entire economy because of the bubble's massive dependence on debt. The old post-World War II growth model based on rising middle-class incomes has been dismantled, while the new neoliberal growth model has imploded. The United States needs a new economic paradigm and a new growth model, but as yet this challenge has received little attention from policymakers or economists.
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:IPE Working Papers, Institute for International Political Economy, HWR Berlin

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
718077881.pdf353.42 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59308

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.