EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >
Public Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59228
  
Title:Quantifying the role of federal and state taxes in mitigating income inequality PDF Logo
Authors:Cooper, Daniel H.
Lutz, Byron F.
Palumbo, Michael G.
Issue Date:2011
Series/Report no.:Public policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 11-7
Abstract:Income inequality has risen dramatically in the United States since at least 1980. This paper quantifies the role that the tax policies of the federal and state governments have played in mitigating this income inequality. The analysis, which isolates the contribution of federal taxes and state taxes separately, employs two approaches. First, cross-sectional estimates compare before-tax and after-tax inequality across the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Second, inequality estimates across time are calculated to assess the evolution of the effects of tax policies. The results from the first approach indicate that the tax code reduces income inequality substantially in all states, with most of the compression of the income distribution attributable to federal taxes. Nevertheless, there is substantial cross-state variation in the extent to which state tax policies compress the income distribution attributable to federal taxes. Cross-state differences in gasoline taxes have a surprisingly large impact on income compression, as do sales tax exemptions for food and clothing. The results of the second approach indicate that there has been little change since the early 1980s in the impact of tax policy on income inequality across almost all states.
JEL:H22
J31
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Public Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
670490431.pdf950.21 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59228

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.