EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >
Public Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59209
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeiland, Franken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-20T16:09:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-20T16:09:30Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/59209-
dc.description.abstractIn order to explain the substantial recent increases in obesity rates in the United States, we consider the effect of falling food prices in the context of a model involving endogenous body weight norms and an explicit, empirically grounded description of human metabolism. Unlike previous representative agent models of price-induced gains in average weight, our model, by including metabolic heterogeneity, is able to capture changes in additional features of the distribution, such as the dramatic growth in upper-quartile weights that are not readily inferred from the representative agent setting. We calibrate an analytical choice model to American women in the 30-to-60-year-old age bracket and compare the model's equilibrium weight distributions to data from NHANES surveys spanning (intermittently) the period from 1976 through 2000. The model predicts increases in average weight and obesity rates with considerable accuracy and captures a considerable portion of the relative growth in upperquantile weights. The differential response to price declines across the distribution depends on the fact that human basal metabolism (or resting calorie expenditure) is increasing and yet concave in body weight, and therefore food price effects on weight tend to be larger for individuals who are heavier initially. The lagged adjustment of weight norms helps to explain recent observations that obesity rates have continued to rise since the mid 1990s, despite an apparent leveling off of price declines. The predicted increase in body weight aspirations agrees with an observed trend in self-reported desired weights, and it defies the conventional wisdom that thinness has been a growing obsession among American women in recent decades.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFederal Reserve Bank of Boston Boston, Mass.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPublic policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 06,5en_US
dc.subject.jelD11en_US
dc.subject.jelI12en_US
dc.subject.jelZ13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheiten_US
dc.subject.stwErnährungen_US
dc.subject.stwNahrungsmittelpreisen_US
dc.subject.stwFrauenen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleSocial dynamics of obesityen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn568695119en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Public Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
568695119.pdf760.53 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.