Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59138
Authors: 
Ağir, Seven
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Center Discussion Paper, Economic Growth Center 999
Abstract: 
During the second half of the eighteenth century, the Ottoman policy-makers adopted a more liberal attitude towards price formation. This was accompanied by the fiscal and administrative centralization of the grain trade. These seemingly contradictory policy changes could, in part, be explained in the context of conjectural changes in grain demand and supply, which rendered pre-emptive privileges and price controls less effective. The policy change, however, was not only a practical response to the strains on the pre-existing supply network but also reflected a new concern with the state of agricultural production along with the emergence of emulation as a development strategy.
Subjects: 
Ottoman economic institutions
grain markets
liberalization
JEL: 
B15
N33
N35
N43
N45
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
332.58 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.