Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/58988
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMarx, Iveen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhille, Josefineen_US
dc.contributor.authorVerbist, Gerlindeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-04en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T07:59:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-15T07:59:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-201111072815-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/58988-
dc.description.abstractRecent studies find in-work poverty to be a pan-European phenomenon. Yet in-work poverty has come to the fore as a policy issue only recently in most continental European countries. Policies implemented in the United States and the United Kingdom, most notably in-work benefit schemes, are much discussed. This article argues that if it comes to preventing and alleviating poverty among workers, both the policy options and constraints facing Continental European policymakers are fundamentally different from those facing Anglo-Saxon policymakers. Consequently, policies that work in one setting cannot be simply emulated elsewhere. We present micro-simulation derived results for Belgium to illustrate some of these points. Policy options discussed and simulated include: higher minimum wages, reductions in employee social security contributions, tax relief for low-paid workers, and the implementation of a stylised version of the British Working Tax Credit. The latter measure has the strongest impact on in-work poverty but in settings where wages are compressed, as in Belgium, a severe trade-off between coverage and budgetary cost presents itself. The article concludes that looking beyond targeted measures to universal benefits and support for employment of carers may be important components of an overall policy package to tackle in-work poverty.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aDiscussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit |x6067en_US
dc.subject.jelI32en_US
dc.subject.jelJ21en_US
dc.subject.jelR28en_US
dc.subject.jelJ68en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordin-work povertyen_US
dc.subject.keywordlow payen_US
dc.subject.keywordin-work benefitsen_US
dc.subject.keywordnegative income taxesen_US
dc.subject.stwNiedriglohnen_US
dc.subject.stwSozialpolitiken_US
dc.subject.stwNegative Einkommensteueren_US
dc.subject.stwAktivierende Sozialhilfeen_US
dc.subject.stwWirkungsanalyseen_US
dc.subject.stwBelgienen_US
dc.titleCombating in-work poverty in continental Europe: An investigation using the Belgian caseen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn689702248en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
664.47 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.