Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/58858
Authors: 
Asadullah, Niaz
Kambhampati, Uma
López Bóo, Florencia
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6329
Abstract: 
This study documents the size and nature of Hindu-Muslim and boy-girl gaps in children's school participation and attainments in India. Individual-level data from two successive rounds of the National Sample Survey suggest that considerable progress has been made in decreasing the Hindu-Muslim gap. Nonetheless, the gap remains sizable even after controlling for numerous socio-economic and parental covariates, and the Muslim educational disadvantage in India today is greater than that experienced by girls and Scheduled Caste Hindu children. A gender gap still appears within as well as between communities, though it is smaller within Muslim communities. While differences in gender and other demographic and socio-economic covariates have recently become more important in explaining the Hindu-Muslim gap, those differences altogether explain only 25 percent to 45 percent of the observed schooling gap.
Subjects: 
gender inequality
India
religion
social disparity
JEL: 
I21
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.05 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.