Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/58669
Authors: 
Barua, Rashmi
Vidal-Fernández, Marian
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6464
Abstract: 
Do negative incentives or sticks in education improve student outcomes? Since the late 1980s, several U.S. states have introduced No Pass No Drive (NPND) laws that set minimum academic requirements for teenagers to obtain driving licenses. Using data from the American Community Survey (ACS) and Monitoring the Future (MTF), we exploit variation across state, time, and cohort to show that NPND laws led to a 6.4 percentage point increase in the probability of graduating from high school among black males. Further, we show that NPND laws were effective in reducing truancy and increased time allocated to school-work at the expense of leisure and work.
Subjects: 
negative incentives
education
allocation of time
dropout
No Pass No Drive laws
JEL: 
J08
J22
I2
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
264.42 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.