EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/58459
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, Wallaceen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiddique, Zahraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-25en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T07:36:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-15T07:36:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-201203016314-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/58459-
dc.description.abstractWe examine racial and ethnic inequality in offers of employer provided fringe benefits (health insurance, life insurance and pension). Restricting to full-time workers in the private sector, we find that African Americans are significantly less likely to get fringe benefit offers than non-Hispanic whites after we control for individual differences in age and youth characteristics that matter for labor market success using the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. We do not find ethnic differences in the 1979 cohort or racial/ethnic differences in the 1997 cohort to be significantly large after controlling for individual differences in age and youth characteristics. Irrespective of race, ethnicity, gender or cohort, we always find that older workers are more likely to get fringe benefit offers as are workers with higher cognitive ability and years of education at age 22. We find that the cross-sections from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth have more fringe benefit offers than cross-sections from the 1997 cohort. A large part of the difference across cohorts can be explained by the older age profile of cross-sections from the 1979 cohort. Some part of the difference across cohorts can also be explained by differences in family background characteristics, particularly changing family structures which are important for non-Hispanic whites and for African American men. Improvements in cognitive ability and years of education at age 22 for the 1997 cohort increase the unexplained difference in fringe benefit offers across the two cohorts for women (irrespective of race or ethnicity), but not for men.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6255en_US
dc.subject.jelI11en_US
dc.subject.jelJ15en_US
dc.subject.jelJ32en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordeconomics of minorities and racesen_US
dc.subject.keywordnon-wage labor costs and benefitsen_US
dc.subject.stwBetriebliche Sozialleistungenen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsmarktdiskriminierungen_US
dc.subject.stwEthnische Diskriminierungen_US
dc.subject.stwFarbige Bevölkerungen_US
dc.subject.stwWeißeen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleRacial and ethnic inequality in employer provided fringe benefitsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn699927528en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
699927528.pdf869.88 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.