EconStor >
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen >
Ibero-Amerika-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (IAI), Universität Göttingen >
Discussion Papers, IAI, Universität Göttingen >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/57305
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorReimers, Malteen_US
dc.contributor.authorKlasen, Stephanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-20T15:53:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-20T15:53:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/57305-
dc.description.abstractWhile the majority of micro studies finds that rural education increases agricultural productivity, various recent cross-country regressions analyzing the determinants of agricultural productivity were only able to detect an insignificant or even surprisingly negative effect of schooling. In this paper, we show that this failure to find a positive impact of education in the international context appears to be a data problem related to the inappropriate use of enrolment and literacy indicators. Using a panel of 95 developing and middle-income countries from 1961 to 2002 that includes data on educational attainment, we show that education indeed has a highly significant, positive effect on agricultural productivity which is robust to the use of different control variables, databases and econometric methods. Distinguishing between different levels of education further reveals that only primary and secondary schooling attainment has a significant positive impact while the effect of tertiary education is insignificant. When distinguishing between income groups, our results indicate that even though the coefficient of the education variable is highly significant and positive for all quintiles, the returns to education are higher for the countries belonging to the richest three quintiles. This finding can be interpreted as support for the claim that education will have larger impacts on agricultural productivity in the presence of rapid technical change since it helps farmers to adjust more readily to the new opportunities provided by technological innovations.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIbero-Amerika-Inst. für Wirtschaftsforschung Göttingenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion papers, Ibero America Institute for Economic Research 214en_US
dc.subject.jelI20en_US
dc.subject.jelI25en_US
dc.subject.jelO13en_US
dc.subject.jelO15en_US
dc.subject.jelO47en_US
dc.subject.jelQ10en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordagricultural productivityen_US
dc.subject.keywordagricultural production functionen_US
dc.subject.keywordcross-country regressionen_US
dc.subject.keywordeducationen_US
dc.subject.keywordhuman capitalen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwAgrarproduktionen_US
dc.subject.stwLandwirtschaften_US
dc.subject.stwProduktivitäten_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwEntwicklungsländeren_US
dc.subject.stwSchwellenländeren_US
dc.titleRevisiting the role of education for agricultural productivityen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn675949491en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Discussion Papers, IAI, Universität Göttingen

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
675949491.pdf658.51 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.