EconStor >
Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson (NY) >
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College >
Working Papers, Levy Economics Institute of Bard College >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/57009
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPapadimitriou, Dimitri B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWray, L. Randallen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-12T14:19:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-12T14:19:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/57009-
dc.description.abstractYet another rescue plan for the European Monetary Union (EMU) is making its way through central Europe, but no one is foolish enough to believe that it will be enough. Greece's finance minister reportedly said that his nation cannot continue to service its debt, and hinted that a 50 percent write-down is likely. That would be just the beginning, however, as other highly indebted periphery nations will follow suit. All the major European banks will be hit - and so will the $3 trillion US market for money market mutual funds, which have about half their funds invested in European banks. Add in other US bank exposure to Europe and you are up to a potential $3 trillion hit to US finance. Another global financial crisis is looking increasingly likely. We first summarize the situation in Euroland. Our main argument will be that the problem is not due to profligate spending by some nations but rather the setup of the EMU itself. We then turn to US problems, assessing the probability of a return to financial crisis and recession. We conclude that difficult times lie ahead, with a high probability that another collapse will be triggered by events in Euroland or in the United States. We conclude with an assessment of possible ways out. It is not hard to formulate economically and technically simple policy solutions for both the United States and Euroland. The real barrier in each case is political - and, unfortunately, the situation is worsening quickly in Europe. It may be too late already.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherLevy Economics Inst. Annandale-on-Hudson, NYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper, Levy Economics Institute 693en_US
dc.subject.jelE32en_US
dc.subject.jelE42en_US
dc.subject.jelF02en_US
dc.subject.jelF33en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordsovereign debten_US
dc.subject.keywordPIIGSen_US
dc.subject.keywordEuropean Monetary Unionen_US
dc.subject.keywordglobal financial crisisen_US
dc.subject.keyworddebt reliefen_US
dc.subject.keywordsectoral balancesen_US
dc.subject.keywordbudget deficitsen_US
dc.subject.keywordFisher debt deflationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsovereign currencyen_US
dc.subject.keywordgreek defaulten_US
dc.titleEuroland in crisis as the global meltdown picks up speeden_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn670626392en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Levy Economics Institute of Bard College

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
670626392.pdf363.77 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.