EconStor >
Philipps-Universität Marburg >
Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Philipps-Universität Marburg >
MAGKS Joint Discussion Paper Series in Economics, Universität Marburg >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/56559
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHayo, Bernden_US
dc.contributor.authorVoigt, Stefanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-08en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-04T13:55:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-04T13:55:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/56559-
dc.description.abstractA country's form of government has important economic and political consequences, but the determinants that lead societies to choose either parliamentary or presidential systems are largely unexplored. This paper studies this choice by analyzing the factors that make countries switch from parliamentary to presidential systems (or vice versa). The analysis proceeds in two steps. First, we identify the survival probability of the existing form of government (drawing on a proportional hazard model). In our model, which is based on 169 countries, we find that geographical factors and former colonial status are important determinants of survival probability. Also, presidential systems are, ceteris paribus, more likely to survive than parliamentary ones. Second, given that a change has taken place, we identify the underlying reasons based on panel data logit models. Wefind that domestic political factors are more important than economic ones. The most important factors relate to intermediate internal armed conflict, sectarian political participation, degree of democratization, and party competition, as well as the extent to which knowledge resources are distributed among the members of society.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniv., Dep. of Business Administration & Economics Marburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJoint discussion paper series in economics 06-2010en_US
dc.subject.jelH11en_US
dc.subject.jelK10en_US
dc.subject.jelP48en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordconstitutional changeen_US
dc.subject.keywordinstitutional dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.keywordform of governmenten_US
dc.subject.keywordendogenous constitutionsen_US
dc.subject.keywordseparation of powersen_US
dc.subject.stwVerfassungsreformen_US
dc.subject.stwPolitische Reformen_US
dc.subject.stwStaatsoberhaupten_US
dc.subject.stwParlamentarismusen_US
dc.subject.stwGewaltenteilungen_US
dc.subject.stwInstitutioneller Wandelen_US
dc.subject.stwPublic Choiceen_US
dc.subject.stwWelten_US
dc.titleDeterminants of constitutional change: Why do countries change their form of government?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn623213214en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:MAGKS Joint Discussion Paper Series in Economics, Universität Marburg

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
623213214.pdf204.63 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.