EconStor >
Stockholm School of Economics >
EFI - The Economic Research Institute, Stockholm School of Economics >
SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance, EFI - The Economic Research Institute, Stockholm School of Economics >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/56278
  
Title:Designing efficient institutions for science-based entrepreneurship: Lessons from the US and Sweden PDF Logo
Authors:Henrekson, Magnus
Rosenberg, Nathan
Issue Date:2000
Series/Report no.:SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 410
Abstract:The recent 'scientification' of commercial technology has brought the interface between universities and industry into sharp focus. In particular, academic entrepreneurship, i.e., the variety of ways in which academics take direct part in the commercialization of research, is widely discussed. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a framework for identifying the strategic individual decisions involved when educational choice is translated into science-based entrepreneurship. Identifying these decisions also allows us to hypothesize what incentive structures should be crucial. Our suggested framework is informally tested by an in-depth examination of the experiences of Sweden and the US. Despite large levels of R&D spending and comprehensive government support schemes, science-based entrepre-neurship has been far less important in Sweden compared to the US. Our analysis points to weaknesses in the Swedish incentive structure in key respects: the rate of return to human capital investment, incentives to become an entrepreneur and to expand existing businesses, and insufficient incentives within the university system to adjust curricula and research budgets to outside demand. Several policy measures during the 1990s have reduced the weaknesses in the Swedish incentive structure. The current emergence of a more vibrant entrepreneurial culture in Sweden in some areas is consistent with these changes. Our analysis suggests that a policy aimed at encouraging science-based entrepreneurship should focus on strengthening individual incentives for human capital investment and entrepreneurial behavior both within universities and in business.
Subjects:Academic entrepreneurship
Innovation
R&D
Spin-off firms
Technology transfer
University-industry relations
Universities and business formation
JEL:J24
O31
O32
O57
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance, EFI - The Economic Research Institute, Stockholm School of Economics

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
333190394.pdf142.16 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/56278

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.