Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/56232
Authors: 
Domeij, David
Flodén, Martin
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 720
Abstract: 
We document a clear increase in Swedish earnings inequality in the early 1990s. Inequality in disposable income and earnings net of taxes and transfers also increased, but much less than the increased inequality in pre-government earnings. These different developments are most likely explained by the generous Swedish welfare system. Consistent with these observations, we see no clear trend in consumption inequality. We also estimate stochastic processes for household earnings. A simple random-walk process captures much of the life-cycle dynamics. But we find clear evidence that the true earnings process is not a random walk. We demonstrate that some estimation methods result in severe upward bias in the estimated volatility of permanent shocks if serial correlation in temporary shocks is ignored. Our estimation results show that the increase in earnings inequality is almost entirely driven by an increase in residual earnings inequality. Moreover, this increase was mostly generated by an increased volatility of persistent shocks.
Subjects: 
income inequality
consumption inequality
stochastic earnings process
JEL: 
D31
D33
E24
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
385.77 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.