Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55914
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFang, Hongyanen_US
dc.contributor.authorNofsinger, John R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-15T14:01:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-15T14:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citation|aThe Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance (JEF) |c1551-9570 |v13 |y2008 |h2 |p25-55en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/55914-
dc.description.abstractDo entrepreneurs consider the risk of their business equity when making investment portfolio allocations? Many people compartmentalize different risks and consider them separately, called mental accounting. Alternatively, the risk substitution hypothesis suggests that entrepreneurs would offset high business income risk by selecting a more conservative investment portfolio. We examine these two hypotheses which have implications for measuring risk tolerance. We find that households with proprietary income show higher risk tolerance than non-entrepreneurs do. Further evidence suggests that a comprehensive measure of relative risk aversion that incorporates households' business income is more reliable and more consistent with their reported risk preference than other measures that do not include business income. In supportive of the risk substitution hypothesis, households do appear to hedge the risk from their private business by decreasing their portion of other risky assets in their investment portfolio.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aThe Academy of Entrepreneurial Finance (AEF) |cMontrose, CAen_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleRisk aversion, entrepreneurial risk, and portfolio selectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.ppn663303893en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
306.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.