EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >
Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAriely, Danen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoewenstein, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrelec, Drazenen_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper challenges the common assumption that economic agents know their tastes. After reviewing previous research showing that valuation of ordinary products and experiences can be manipulated by non-normative cues, we present three studies showing that in some cases people do not even have a pre-existing sense of whether an experience is good or bad - even when they have experienced a sample of it.en_US
dc.publisherFederal Reserve Bank of Boston Boston, MAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper series // Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 05-10en_US
dc.subject.keywordpreference uncertaintyen_US
dc.subject.keywordcoherent arbitrarinessen_US
dc.titleTom Sawyer and the construction of valueen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
Appears in Collections:Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
505087278.pdf1.24 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.