EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >
Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55582
  
Title:Moral hazard, peer monitoring, and microcredit: Field experimental evidence from Paraguay PDF Logo
Authors:Carpenter, Jeffrey
Williams, Tyler
Issue Date:2010
Series/Report no.:Working paper series // Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 10-6
Abstract:Given the substantial amount of resources currently invested in microcredit programs, it is more important than ever to accurately assess the extent to which peer monitoring by borrowers faced with group liability contracts actually reduces moral hazard. We conduct a field experiment with women about to enter a group loan program in Paraguay and then gather administrative data on the members´ repayment behavior in the six-month period following the experiment. In addition to the experiment which is designed to measure individual propensities to monitor under incentives similar to group liability, we collect a variety of the other potential correlates of borrowing behavior and repayment. Controlling for other factors, we find a very strong causal relationship between the monitoring propensity of one´s loan group and repayment. Our lowest estimate suggests that borrowers in groups with above median monitoring are 36 percent less likely to have a problem repaying their portion of the loan. Besides confirming a number of previous results, we also find some evidence that risk preferences, social preferences, and cognitive skills affect repayment.
JEL:C93
D03
D14
G21
O16
O54
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
63596323X.pdf283.98 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55582

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.