EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >
Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55557
  
Title:Multiple selves in intertemporal choice PDF Logo
Authors:Jamison, Julian
Wegener, Jon
Issue Date:2009
Series/Report no.:Working paper series // Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 09-17
Abstract:We propose that individuals consider future versions of themselves to truly be separate persons, not simply as a convenient modeling device but in terms of actual brain systems and decision]making processes. Intertemporal choices are thus quite literally strategic interactions between multiple agents. Previous neuroscientific studies have found evidence that systems involved with Theory of Mind (that is, mentalizing other agents) are similar to those involved with prospection (imagining oneself in the future). We provide a conceptual framework for this work and suggest that, instead of prospection, a more analogous future task is one that concerns intertemporal choice and time preferences, since these involve implicit prediction of future actions. Recent functional imaging studies appear to confirm such a link. Additional studies.behavioral, clinical, and neuroimaging.are proposed in order to confirm the specific nature of the correspondence and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Finally, given that society may have a vested interest in promoting the welfare of future selves, we discuss possible policy implications of departing from the standard framework in which individuals act in their own best interests as defined over the entire lifetime.
Subjects:intertemporal choice
theory of mind
mentalizing
intrapersonal games
neuroeconomics
JEL:D90
D87
D62
D03
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
615796672.pdf489.43 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55557

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.