EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >
Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55547
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Mary A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHeiland, Franken_US
dc.contributor.authorNadler, Carlen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-28en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-23T07:59:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-23T07:59:21Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/55547-
dc.description.abstractWe test for differences across the two most recent NHANES survey periods (19881994 and 1999 2004) in self-perception of weight status. We find that the probability of self-classifying as overweight is significantly lower on average in the more recent survey, for both men and women, controlling for objective weight status and other factors. Among women, the decline in the tendency to self-classify as overweight is concentrated in the 1735 age range, and, within this range, is more pronounced among women with normal BMI than among those with overweight BMI. Among men, the shift away from feeling overweight is roughly equal across age groups, except that the oldest group (5674) exhibits no difference between surveys. In addition, overweight men exhibit a sharper decline in feeling overweight than normal-weight men. Despite the declines in feeling overweight between surveys, weight misperception did not increase significantly for men and decreased by a sizable margin among women. The shifts in selfclassification are not explained by differences between surveys in body fatness or waist circumference, nor by shifting demographics. We interpret the findings as evidence of a generational shift in social norms related to body weight, and propose various mechanisms to explain such a shift, including: (1) higher average adult BMI and adult obesity rates in the later survey cohort, (2) higher childhood obesity rates in the later survey cohort, and (3) public education campaigns promoting healthy body image. The welfare implications of the observed trends in self-classification are mixed.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFederal Reserve Bank of Boston Boston, MAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper series // Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 09-3en_US
dc.subject.jelI10en_US
dc.subject.jelJ11en_US
dc.subject.jelZ13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.stwKörpergewichten_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Normen_US
dc.subject.stwTheorieen_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleHas overweight become the new normal? Evidence of a generational shift in body weight normsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn598679871en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
598679871.pdf410.14 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.