EconStor >
Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg (TUHH) >
Institut für Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement (TIM), Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg >
Arbeitspapiere, Institut für Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, TU Hamburg-Harburg >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55508
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHerstatt, Corneliusen_US
dc.contributor.authorKohlbacher, Florianen_US
dc.contributor.authorBauer, Patricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-06en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-17T13:36:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-17T13:36:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/55508-
dc.description.abstractAging populations challenge companies across different countries and industries to respond to the changing needs, demands and expectations of their growing shares of older customers. This opens room for improving or developing innovations - products as well as services - that correspond to the diverse expectations. New product development for older customers or 'Silver' product design is one way to approach the 'silver' market - without explicitly excluding younger customers. Research in this field is still in its infancy. Silver product design focuses on individual autonomy, representing an elementary aspect of good life, disappearing in a more or less continuous manner over the life cycle of a human being. Offering solutions that will allow people to maintain or recover autonomy and to use products and services in an independent manner therefore seems to be a promising avenue for companies innovating across different industries. The general concept of autonomy can be perceived as a boundary-spanning argument and a common denominator for starting development initiatives leading to innovations targeting the silver market. Cross-case analysis based on four different product innovations addressing typical needs of older people are used to present how firms in different industrial contexts and user-settings address such needs, which have their roots in a need to stay autonomous and independent. Technological, marketing and strategy-related observations as well as communalities and differences of the cases are being discussed and very first implications for managing the front end of silver product development sketched.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTechn. Univ. Hamburg-Harburg Hamburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Papers / Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg 65en_US
dc.subject.ddc650en_US
dc.subject.keywordDemographic changeen_US
dc.subject.keywordagingen_US
dc.subject.keywordolder usersen_US
dc.subject.keywordsilver marketen_US
dc.subject.keywordinnovation managementen_US
dc.subject.keywordsilver product designen_US
dc.subject.keywordindividual autonomyen_US
dc.title"Silver" product design: Product innovation for older peopleen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn684535580en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:tuhtim:65-
Appears in Collections:Arbeitspapiere, Institut für Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement, TU Hamburg-Harburg

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
684535580.pdf303.49 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.