EconStor >
Queen Mary, University of London >
School of Economics and Finance, Queen Mary, University of London  >
Working Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance, Queen Mary, University of London  >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55200
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKaranassou, Marikaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSala, Hectoren_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-09T14:07:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-09T14:07:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/55200-
dc.description.abstractThis paper aims at identifying the labour share (wage-productivity gap) as a major factor in the evolution of inequality and employment. To this end, we use annual data for the US, UK and Sweden over the past forty years and estimate country-specific systems of labour demand and Gini coefficient equations. Further to the statistical significance of our models, we validate their economic significance through counterfactual simulations. In particular, we evaluate the contributions of the labour share to the trajectories of inequality and employment during specific time intervals in the post-1990 years. We find that during the nineties the cost of a one percent increase in employment was in the range of 0.7%-0.9% higher inequality in all three countries. However, in the 2000s, whereas the inequality-employment sensitivity ratio slightly fell in the US, it exceeded unity in the countries on the other side of the Atlantic. It obtained its highest value in the UK, where a 1% growth in employment was achieved at the expense of 1.3% worsening in income inequality. In the light of the significant influence of the time-varying labour share on the inequality and employment time paths documented in our sample, the evolution of the wage-productivity gap deserves the attention of policy makers.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherQueen Mary, Univ. of London, School of Economics and Finance Londonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Paper // School of Economics and Finance, Queen Mary, University of London 680en_US
dc.subject.jelD30en_US
dc.subject.jelE25en_US
dc.subject.jelE24en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordincome inequalityen_US
dc.subject.keywordlabour income shareen_US
dc.subject.keywordemploymenten_US
dc.subject.stwLohnquoteen_US
dc.subject.stwEinkommensverteilungen_US
dc.subject.stwBeschäftigungen_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.subject.stwGroßbritannienen_US
dc.subject.stwSchwedenen_US
dc.titleInequality and employment sensitivities to the falling labour shareen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn663442168en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Working Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance, Queen Mary, University of London

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
663442168.pdf325.39 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.