EconStor >
United Nations University (UNU) >
World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER), United Nations University >
WIDER Working Papers, United Nations University (UNU) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/54013
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorS., Jomo K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, Wee Chongen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-18en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-15T13:16:06Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-15T13:16:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-92-9230-339-6en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/54013-
dc.description.abstractMalaysian economic development has been shaped by public policy in response to changing national and external conditions. Public investments peaked in the 1970s and early 1980s, until the policy reversals driven by sovereign debt concerns and new policy ideology fads. Foreign investments continued to be favoured after independence for ethnic political reasons. Thus, foreign investments continued to be very significant in financial services as well as manufacturing growth, both for import substitution from the 1960s and for export from the 1970s. Private investments were attracted by government provision of infrastructure, cheap but schooled labour, tax incentives, lax environmental regulations and an undervalued currency. Poverty reduction and ownership redistribution by ethnicity were most successful during the 1970s and early 1980s, although it is unclear how much these improved inter-ethnic relations. Economic liberalization and the growing influence of business interests and political elites have undermined the government's developmental role, culminating in the 1997-8 financial crisis and lacklustre growth since. Malaysian industrialization could only have been achieved with appropriate incentives for investments and technical progress through key policy interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWIDER Helsinkien_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper // World Institute for Development Economics Research 2010,102en_US
dc.subject.jelO16en_US
dc.subject.jelO2en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordMalaysiaen_US
dc.subject.keyworddevelopment strategiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordliberalizationen_US
dc.subject.keywordinterventionen_US
dc.titleLessons from post-colonial Malaysian economic developmenten_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn636865363en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:WIDER Working Papers, United Nations University (UNU)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
636865363.pdf97.56 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.