EconStor >
United Nations University (UNU) >
World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER), United Nations University >
WIDER Working Papers, United Nations University (UNU) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/53999
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, James H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-13en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-15T13:15:47Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-15T13:15:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-92-9230-304-4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/53999-
dc.description.abstractRecent efforts to reinvigorate the connections between urban planning and health have usefully brought the field back to one of its original roles. Current research, however, has focused on industrialized cities, overlooking some of the important urbanization processes in poor countries. This paper describes an emerging 'health transition' and the importance of socio-ecological approaches to understanding new health challenges in the developing world and uses the empirical case of Vietnam to examine the development dilemma of new industrial health concerns associated with economic development. The paper summarizes original qualitative data suggesting that one of the main benefits and rationales of the system is the improvement in public health that it has promoted. Using a related original sample survey (n=200) from 2005, the paper then tests a set of hypotheses about the relationship between illness, connections to the new system, and the role of pollution of natural water sources in illness. Findings suggest that fears of illness, and in particular new forms of industrial illnesses, are growing with rapid development as old forms of acute water borne disease are of less concern.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWIDER Helsinkien_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper // World Institute for Development Economics Research 2010,66en_US
dc.subject.jelH4en_US
dc.subject.jelH7en_US
dc.subject.jelQ5en_US
dc.subject.jelP3en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordWater supplyen_US
dc.subject.keywordperceptionsen_US
dc.subject.keywordenvironmental healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordtransitionen_US
dc.subject.keywordurbanizationen_US
dc.titleHealth and the urban transition: Effects of household perceptions, illness, and environmental pollution on clean water investmenten_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn636614786en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:WIDER Working Papers, United Nations University (UNU)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
636614786.pdf87.32 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.