EconStor >
Bank of Canada, Ottawa >
Bank of Canada Working Papers >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDamar, H. Evrenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeh, Césaire A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTerajima, Yazen_US
dc.description.abstractSome evidence points to the procyclicality of leverage among financial institutions leading to aggregate volatility. This procyclicality occurs when financial institutions finance their assets with non-equity funding (i.e., debt financed asset expansions). Wholesale funding is an important source of market-based funding that allows some institutions to quickly adjust their leverage. As such, financial institutions that rely on wholesale funding are expected to have higher degrees of leverage procyclicality. Using high frequency balance sheet data for the universe of banks, this study tries to identify (i) if such a positive link exists between the assets and leverage in Canada, (ii) how wholesale funding plays a role for this link, and (iii) market and macroeconomic factors associated with this link. The findings of the empirical analysis suggest that a strong positive link exists between asset growth and leverage growth, and the use to wholesale funding is an important determinant of this relationship. Furthermore, liquidity of several short-term funding markets matters for procyclicality of leverage.en_US
dc.publisherBank of Canada Ottawaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBank of Canada Working Paper 2010,39en_US
dc.subject.keywordFinancial stabilityen_US
dc.subject.keywordFinancial system regulation and policiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordRecent economic and financial developmentsen_US
dc.titleLeverage, balance sheet size and wholesale fundingen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
Appears in Collections:Bank of Canada Working Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
642546894.pdf321.61 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.