Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/53598
Authors: 
Anbumozhi, Venkatachalam
Chotichanathawewong, Qwanruedee
Murugesh, Thirumalainambi
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
ADBI working paper series 305
Abstract: 
Environmental information disclosure strategies, which involve corporate attempts to increase the availability of information on pollution and emissions, can become a basis for a new wave of environmental protection policy that follows and has the potential to complement traditional command and control and market-based approaches. Although a growing body of literature and operational programs suggest that publicly disclosing the information can motivate improved corporate environmental performance, this phenomenon remains poorly understood. This paper reviews the economic and legitimacy theory behind information disclosure and analyzes the current practice and programs adopted in industrialized and industrializing countries. Admittedly few in number, the cases studied reveal the advantages of such voluntary approaches, when the countries of developing Asia must deal with weak institutions, growing markets, and strong communities. Factors that contributed to widespread success of selected programs in the People's Republic of China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, and the United States are information quality, the dissemination mechanisms, provision of incentives for good performers, and public and private pressure.
JEL: 
Q52
Q53
Q57
Q58
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
285.21 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.