EconStor >
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM), Mailand >
FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei  >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/53299
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBlanford, Geoffrey J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRichels, Richard G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Thomas F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-13en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-15T11:32:42Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-15T11:32:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/53299-
dc.description.abstractRecent growth in carbon dioxide emissions from China's energy sector has exceeded expectations. In a major US government study of future emissions released in 2007 (1), participating models appear to have substantially underestimated the near-term rate of increase in China's emissions. We present a recalibration of one of those models to be consistent with both current observations and historical development patterns. The implications of the new specification for the feasibility of commonly discussed stabilization targets, particularly when considering incomplete global participation, are profound. Unless China's emissions begin to depart soon from their (newly projected) business-as-usual path, stringent stabilization goals may be unattainable. The current round of global policy negotiations must engage China and other developing countries, not to the exclusion of emissions reductions in the developed world and possibly with the help of significant financial incentives, if such goals are to be achieved. It is in all nations' interests to work cooperatively to limit our interference with the global climate.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) Milanoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNota di lavoro // Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei: Sustainable development 68.2008en_US
dc.subject.jelQ48en_US
dc.subject.jelH23en_US
dc.subject.jelO13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordEnergy-Economy Modelingen_US
dc.subject.keywordChinaen_US
dc.subject.keywordEconomic Growth Ratesen_US
dc.subject.keywordEnergy Intensityen_US
dc.subject.keywordInternational Climate Policyen_US
dc.titleImpact of revised CO2 growth projections for China on global stabilization goalsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn643915311en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
643915311.pdf414.7 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.