EconStor >
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM), Mailand >
FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei  >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/53234
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMochizuki, Junkoen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, ZhongXiangen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-15T11:31:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-15T11:31:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/53234-
dc.description.abstractChina's emerging standing in the world demands a major rethinking of its diplomatic strategies. Given its population size, geographical scale, economic power and military presence, China is poised to play a larger political role in the twenty-first century, and is thus perceived by the international community to have greater capacities, capabilities and responsibilities. At the same time, environmental stresses caused by China's energy and resources demands have become increasingly evident in recent years, urging China to cultivate delicate diplomatic relations with its neighbors and strategic partners. Tensions have been seen in areas such as transboundary air pollution, cross-border water resources management and resources exploitation, and more recently in global issues such as climate change. As the Chinese leadership begins to embrace the identity of a responsible developing country, it is becoming apparent that while unabated resources demands and environmental deterioration may pose a great threat to environmental security, a shared sense of urgency could foster enhanced cooperation. For China to move beyond existing and probable diplomatic tensions, a greater attention to domestic and regional environmental security will no doubt be necessary. This article explores such interrelations among domestic, regional and global environmental securities and China's diplomacy, and suggests possible means by which China could contribute to strengthening global environmental security.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFondazione Eni Enrico Mattei Milanoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNota di lavoro // Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei: Sustainable development 30.2011en_US
dc.subject.jelQ25en_US
dc.subject.jelQ34en_US
dc.subject.jelQ48en_US
dc.subject.jelQ42en_US
dc.subject.jelQ53en_US
dc.subject.jelQ54en_US
dc.subject.jelQ56en_US
dc.subject.jelQ58en_US
dc.subject.jelO13en_US
dc.subject.jelP28en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordAcid Rainen_US
dc.subject.keywordClimate Changeen_US
dc.subject.keywordEnergyen_US
dc.subject.keywordEnvironmental Securityen_US
dc.subject.keywordTransboundary Air Pollutionen_US
dc.subject.keywordWater Resource Managementen_US
dc.subject.keywordAsiaen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental security and its implications for China's foreign relationsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn655959017en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
655959017.pdf292.43 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.