EconStor >
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM), Mailand >
FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei  >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/53185
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPongiglione, Francescaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-15T11:30:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-15T11:30:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/53185-
dc.description.abstractIn this essay, three separate yet interconnected components of pro-environmental decision making are considered: (a) knowledge, in the form of basic scientific understanding and procedural knowledge, (b) risk perception, as it relates to an individual's direct experience of climate change and (c) self-interest, either monetary or status-driven. Drawing on a variety of sources in public policy, psychology, and economics, I examine the role of these concepts in inducing or discouraging pro-environmental behavior. Past researches have often overemphasized the weight of just one of those variables in the decision making. I argue, instead, that none of them alone is capable of bringing about the behavioral change required by the environmental crisis. Evidence shows that increasing the public's scientific knowledge of climate change cannot unilaterally bring about a strong behavioral change. The same can be noticed even when knowledge is joined by risk-perception: deep psychological mechanisms may steer people towards inaction and apathy, despite their direct experience of the detrimental effects of climate change on their lives. Focusing on self-interest alone is similarly unable to induce pro-environmental behavior, due to a host of psychological factors. Instead, in all of the above cases an important missing ingredient may be found in providing the public with locally contextualized procedural knowledge in order to translate its knowledge and concern into action. The importance of this kind of practical knowledge has solid empirical and theoretical underpinnings, and is often overlooked in the climate-change debate that tends to focus on more high-level issues. Yet, for all its essential simplicity, it may carry important public-policy implications.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) Milanoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNota di lavoro // Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei: Climate Change and Sustainable Development 72.2011en_US
dc.subject.jelD03en_US
dc.subject.jelD80en_US
dc.subject.jelQ00en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordIndividual Behavioren_US
dc.subject.keywordClimate-Changeen_US
dc.subject.keywordPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordUncertaintyen_US
dc.titleClimate change and individual decision making: An examination of knowledge, risk perception, self-interest and their interplayen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn668928131en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
668928131.pdf332.01 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.