EconStor >
United Nations University (UNU) >
World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER), United Nations University >
WIDER Discussion Papers, United Nations University (UNU) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/52925
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Howarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-14T09:43:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-14T09:43:58Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9291903396en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/52925-
dc.description.abstractOfficial flows account for close to half of capital flows to developing countries, and close to 90 per cent of receipts for Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper documents trends in these official flows over the last three decades. The most striking trend has been declining aid volume. Following two decades of relative stability, official flows have decline in the 1990s; in particular aid to just 0.2 per cent of donor GNP. A second trend is the decline in aid to low-income countries, partly as aid flows are diverted to transition economies and ‘trouble spots’. As a result of these trends, real aid per capita to Sub-Saharan Africa fell by 40 per cent in the 1990s. Continuing an existing trend, multilateral agencies have accounted for a growing share of total aid, in part as a result of the expansion of EU aid, but non-EU donors have contributed more of their aid through the UN system. Positive developments have been the increased concessionality of aid and a move toward untying. However, substantial parts of the multilateral system, notably the World Bank, continue to extend loans rather than grants. And the move to untying is not well-established, having been somewhat reversed in some countries in recent years. Finally, the aid programme of most donors is thinly spread over many recipients. Whilst there are good grounds to question the current fashion for selectivity, there remain good developmental arguments for greater concentration by individual donors.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUNU-WIDER Helsinkien_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWIDER Discussion Papers // World Institute for Development Economics (UNU-WIDER) 2002/106en_US
dc.subject.jelF34en_US
dc.subject.jelF35en_US
dc.subject.jelO19en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keyworddevelopment aiden_US
dc.subject.keywordbilateral aiden_US
dc.subject.keywordmultilateral aiden_US
dc.subject.stwEntwicklungshilfeen_US
dc.subject.stwEntwicklungskooperationen_US
dc.titleLong-run trends and recent developments in official assistance from donor countriesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn358489113en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:WIDER Discussion Papers, United Nations University (UNU)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
358489113.pdf241.54 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.