EconStor >
Leibniz-Institut für Agrarentwicklung in Transformationsökonomien (IAMO), Halle (Saale) >
IAMO Forum 2010: Institutions in Transition – Challenges for New Modes of Governance >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/52695
  
Title:Analysing agricultural productivity growth in a framework of institutional quality PDF Logo
Authors:Nomman Ahmed, Mirza
Maas, Sarah
Schmitz, P. Michael
Issue Date:2010
Series/Report no.:IAMO Forum 2010, Halle (Saale), June 16 – 18, 2010: Institutions in Transition - Challenges for New Modes of Governance
Abstract:This paper addresses the question whether the institutional environment of transition countries in Eastern Europe affects productivity growth in the agricultural sector. Situated in a neoclassical growth framework, a dynamic panel model for the period 1996-2005 provides evidence that poor institutional quality leads to a slowdown in agricultural productivity growth. Productivity growth is limited by a high degree of corruption, which is of particular importance given that corruption has been proven to be most prevalent in Eastern European countries. Moreover, agricultural productivity in countries where privatisation and transferability of land is restricted is found to grow at a slower rate than countries supporting market-oriented land reforms. Interestingly, the results suggest that a high degree of openness leads to a loss in agricultural productivity, suggesting that timing and sequencing of trade reforms matter. An improvement of the poor institutional quality is thus of central importance to accelerate productivity growth in Eastern European countries.
Subjects:Eastern Europe
Transition
Productivity growth
Document Type:Conference Paper
Appears in Collections:IAMO Forum 2010: Institutions in Transition – Challenges for New Modes of Governance

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
67652124X.pdf159.32 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/52695

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.