EconStor >
International Telecommunications Society (ITS) >
22nd European Regional ITS Conference, Budapest 2011 >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/52194
  
Title:Regulation of network industries in the European Union and in Central and Eastern Europe PDF Logo
Authors:Major, Iván
Kiss, Károly M.
Issue Date:2011
Series/Report no.:22nd European Regional Conference of the International Telecommunications Society (ITS2011), Budapest, 18 - 21 September, 2011: Innovative ICT Applications - Emerging Regulatory, Economic and Policy Issues
Abstract:Cost-based pricing has dominated the regulatory regime of network industries - and first of all, the regulation of the infocommunications sector - in the European Union since the early 1990s. When privatization of network industries began in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), one of the main stumbling blocks on the road toward privately owned telecomm companies and postal services, energy producers and distributors, and other network industries was the lack of efficient and up-to-date industry regulations. From the mid-1990s, accessing countries that later became members of the EU, and other CEE countries that are still waiting for admission swiftly adopted the regulatory framework of the European Union. The EU has been striving for market opening and liberalization in these industries; it abolished industry regulation in several segments of the market of network industries. Now it applies so-called cost-based pricing in areas where regulation is still in place. CEE countries now use the same type of regulation as the advanced member states of the EU. But the regulatory capacity of most CEE countries is still far behind of their West European counterparts. Experts of network industries advocate, and telecommunications, energy and other market regulators in various parts of the world practice, cost-based pricing for inter-firm network access services. Cost-based pricing is carried out under the assumption that the regulator has perfect information regarding the costs of producing the services. We show in this paper that - under fairly general conditions - cost-based pricing creates incentives for regulated firms not to improve their efficiency. We also show that cost-based pricing results in smaller consumer welfare than incentive regulation that takes into account the existence of information asymmetry between the regulator and the firm. A model of interconnection with adverse selection and moral hazard is presented.
Subjects:network industries
regulation
incentive contracts
JEL:D8
L14
L51
Document Type:Conference Paper
Appears in Collections:22nd European Regional ITS Conference, Budapest 2011

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
672542536.pdf134.04 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/52194

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.