EconStor >
International Telecommunications Society (ITS) >
22nd European Regional ITS Conference, Budapest 2011 >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/52169
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWaldman, Helioen_US
dc.contributor.authorBortoletto, Rodrigo C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPavani, Gustavo S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-24T11:13:20Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-24T11:13:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/52169-
dc.description.abstractThe paper discusses the dimensioning strategies of two network providers (operators) that supply channels to the same population of users in a competitive environment. Usersare assumed to compete for best service (lowest blocking probability of new request), while operators wishto maximize their profits. This setting gives rise to two interconnected, noncooperative games: a) a users game, in which the partition of primary traffic between operators is determined by the operators' channel capacities and by the users' blocking-avoidance strategy; and b) a network dimensioning game between operators in which the players alternate dimensioning decisions thatmaximize their profit rate under the current channel capacity of his/her opponent. At least for two plausible users' blocking avoidance strategies discussed in the paper, the users game will always reach some algorithmic equilibrium. In the operators' game, the player strategies are given by their numbers of deployed chanels, limited by their available infrastructure resources. If the infrastrucutre is under-dimensioned with respect to the traffic rate, the operators game willreach a Nash equilibrium when both players reach full use of their available infrastructures. Otherweise, a Nash equilibrium may also arise if both operators incur the same deployment costs. If costs are asymmetric, though, the alternating game may enter a loop. If the asymmetry is modest, both players may then try to achieve a competitive monopoly in which the opponent is forced to leave the game or operate with a loss (negative profit). However, if the asymmetry is high enough, only the player with the lower costs can force his opponent to leave the game while still holding a profitable operation.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherITS Budapesten_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries22nd European Regional Conference of the International Telecommunications Society (ITS2011), Budapest, 18 - 21 September, 2011: Innovative ICT Applications - Emerging Regulatory, Economic and Policy Issuesen_US
dc.subject.jelC72en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordnetwork dimensioningen_US
dc.subject.keywordgame theoryen_US
dc.subject.keywordduopolyen_US
dc.subject.keywordNash equilibriumen_US
dc.subject.keywordcircuit switchingen_US
dc.subject.keywordblocking probabilityen_US
dc.titleAgame-theoretical approach to network capacity planning under competitionen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn672614758en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:itse11:52169-
Appears in Collections:22nd European Regional ITS Conference, Budapest 2011

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
672614758.pdf1.36 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.