EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/52027
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGoeree, Michelle S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHam, John C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIorio, Danielaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-11en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T11:42:24Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-23T11:42:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-201107042722en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/52027-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we explore a serious eating disorder, bulimia nervosa (BN), which afflicts a surprising number of girls in the US. We challenge the long-held belief that BN primarily affects high income White teenagers, using a unique data set on adolescent females evaluated regarding their tendencies towards bulimic behaviors independent of any diagnoses or treatment they have received. Our results reveal that African Americans are more likely to exhibit bulimic behavior than Whites; as are girls from low income families compared to middle and high income families. We use another data set to show that who is diagnosed with an eating disorder is in accord with popular beliefs, suggesting that African American and low-income girls are being under-diagnosed for BN. Our findings have important implications for public policy since they provide direction to policy makers regarding which adolescent females are most at risk for BN. Our results are robust to different model specifications and identifying assumptions.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5823en_US
dc.subject.jelI1en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordbulimia nervosaen_US
dc.subject.keywordraceen_US
dc.subject.keywordincomeen_US
dc.subject.keywordeducationen_US
dc.titleRace, social class, and bulimia nervosaen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn669614920en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
669614920.pdf291.05 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.