EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51898
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMillimet, Daniel L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Jayjiten_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-25en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T11:38:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-23T11:38:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20110927147en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/51898-
dc.description.abstractThe validity of existing empirical tests of the Pollution Haven Hypothesis (PHH) is constantly under scrutiny due to two shortcomings. First, the issues of unobserved heterogeneity and measurement error in environmental regulation are typically ignored due to the lack of a credible, traditional instrumental variable. Second, while the recent literature has emphasized the importance of geographic spillovers in determining the location choice of foreign investment, such spatial effects have yet to be adequately incorporated into empirical tests of the PHH. As a result, the impact of environmental regulations on trade patterns and the location decisions of multinational enterprises remains unclear. In this paper, we circumvent the lack of a traditional instrument within a model incorporating geographic spillovers utilizing three novel identification strategies. Using state-level panel data on inbound U.S. FDI, relative abatement costs, and other determinants of FDI, we consistently find (i) evidence of environmental regulation being endogenous, (ii) a negative impact of own environmental regulation on inbound FDI in pollution-intensive sectors, particularly when measured by employment, and (iii) larger effects of environmental regulation once endogeneity is addressed. Neighboring environmental regulation is not found to be an important determinant of FDI.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5911en_US
dc.subject.jelC31en_US
dc.subject.jelF21en_US
dc.subject.jelQ52en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordforeign direct investmenten_US
dc.subject.keywordenvironmental regulationen_US
dc.subject.keywordspilloversen_US
dc.subject.keywordinstrumental variablesen_US
dc.subject.keywordcontrol functionen_US
dc.subject.keywordheteroskedasticityen_US
dc.titleThree new empirical tests of the pollution haven hypothesis when environmental regulation is endogenousen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn670524131en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
670524131.pdf319.26 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.