Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51644
Authors: 
Hazans, Mihails
Philips, Kaia
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5878
Abstract: 
We use Lithuanian, Latvian and Estonian LFS data (2002-2007) complemented with several other surveys to compare the profile of Baltic temporary workers abroad before and after EU accession with that of stayers and return migrants. Determinants of migration and return, as well as selection issues are discussed. Post-enlargement migrants from all three countries were significantly less educated than stayers. After accession, medium-educated workers were most likely to move, other things equal, and human capital became increasingly less pro-migration over time. Return migrants differ from all movers in many ways and, in particular, are more educated. Although brain drain was not a feature of post-accession Baltic migration, brain waste was: during 2006-2007, the proportion of overqualified among high-educated movers ranged from five out of ten for Latvia to seven out of ten for Lithuania, but it was around one fifth among high-educated stayers in all three countries. We find that the free movement of labor partially introduced in 2004 (and expanded in 2006) for EU citizens, although excluding Baltic non-citizens, brought about significant changes in how ethnicity and citizenship affect workers' mobility. We conclude by discussing migration perspectives in the context of recession.
Subjects: 
migration
EU enlargement
Baltic countries
return migrants
ethnic minorities
JEL: 
J61
J15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
330.81 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.