EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51579
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBraga, Michelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaccagnella, Marcoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPellizzari, Micheleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T11:30:21Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-23T11:30:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-201104134190en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/51579-
dc.description.abstractThis paper contrasts measures of teacher effectiveness with the students' evaluations for the same teachers using administrative data from Bocconi University (Italy). The effectiveness measures are estimated by comparing the subsequent performance in follow-on coursework of students who are randomly assigned to teachers in each of their compulsory courses. We find that, even in a setting where the syllabuses are fixed and all teachers in the same course present exactly the same material, teachers still matter substantially. The average difference in subsequent performance between students who were assigned to the best and worst teacher (on the effectiveness scale) is approximately 43% of a standard deviation in the distribution of exam grades, corresponding to about 5.6% of the average grade. Additionally, we find that our measure of teacher effectiveness is negatively correlated with the students' evaluations: in other words, teachers who are associated with better subsequent performance receive worst evaluations from their students. We rationalize these results with a simple model where teachers can either engage in real teaching or in teaching-to-the-test, the former requiring higher students' effort than the latter. Teaching-to-the-test guarantees high grades in the current course but does not improve future outcomes. Hence, if students are myopic and evaluate better teachers from which they derive higher utility in a static framework, the model is capable of predicting our empirical finding that good teachers receive bad evaluations, especially when teaching-to-the-test is very effective (for example, with multiple choice tests). Consistently with the predictions of the model, we also find that classes in which high skill students are over-represented produce evaluations that are less at odds with estimated teacher effectiveness.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5620en_US
dc.subject.jelI20en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordteacher qualityen_US
dc.subject.keywordpostsecondary educationen_US
dc.subject.stwHochschullehreren_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsleistungen_US
dc.subject.stwBewertungen_US
dc.subject.stwStudierendeen_US
dc.subject.stwVerhaltensökonomiken_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwItalienen_US
dc.titleEvaluating students' evaluations of professorsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn665262329en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
665262329.pdf716.12 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.