EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51569
  
Title:Parental health and child schooling PDF Logo
Authors:Bratti, Massimiliano
Mendola, Mariapia
Issue Date:2011
Series/Report no.:Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5870
Abstract:Evidence on the role of parental health on child schooling is surprisingly thin. We explore this issue by estimating the short-run effects of parents' illness on child school enrollment. Our analysis is based on household panel data from Bosnia-Herzegovina, a country whose health and educational systems underwent extensive destruction during the 1992-1995 war. Using child fixed effects to correct for potential endogeneity bias, we find that - contrary to the common wisdom that shocks to the primary household earner should have more negative consequences for child education - it is especially maternal health that makes a difference as far as child schooling is concerned. Children whose mothers self-reported having poor health are about 7 percentage points less likely to be enrolled in education at ages 15-24. These results are robust to considering alternative indicators of parental health status such as the presence of limitations in the activities of daily living and depression symptoms. Moreover, we find that mothers' health shocks have more negative consequences on younger children and sons.
Subjects:Bosnia and Herzegovina
children
education
parents
school
self-reported health
JEL:I21
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition:urn:nbn:de:101:1-201108092973
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
669718653.pdf397.65 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51569

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.