Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51484
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBobba, Matteoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-23en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-18T11:48:12Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-18T11:48:12Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/51484-
dc.description.abstractThe literature on aid effectiveness has focused more on recipient policies than the determinants of aid allocation yet a consistent result is that political allies obtain more aid from donors than non-allies. This paper shows that aid allocated to political allies is ineffective for growth, whereas aid extended to countries that are not allies is highly effective. The result appears to be robust across different specifications and estimation techniques. In particular, new methods are employed to control for endogeneity. The paper suggests that aid allocation should be scrutinized carefully to make aid as effective as possible.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInter-American Development Bank, Research Dep. |cWashington, DCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aWorking paper // Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department |x601en_US
dc.subject.jelO1en_US
dc.subject.jelO2en_US
dc.subject.jelO4en_US
dc.subject.jelC23en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordAid impacten_US
dc.subject.keywordEconomic growthen_US
dc.subject.keywordInstrumental Variablesen_US
dc.subject.keywordGeneralized method of momentsen_US
dc.subject.keywordPanel dataen_US
dc.titleAid effectiveness: Politics mattersen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn585536627en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
205.49 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.