Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51436
Authors: 
Lora, Eduardo
Chaparro, Juan Camilo
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
Working paper // Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department 642
Abstract: 
This paper makes use of the 2006 Gallup World Survey, which includes opinions on satisfaction with various aspects of life in 130 countries. Although a very solid relationship is found between satisfaction and income (both across and within countries), raising doubts regarding the well-known Easterlin Paradox, a new paradox arises: 'unhappy growth', where faster growth rates are accompanied by lower levels of satisfaction. The losses of satisfaction associated with growth are more pronounced in the material domains of life and are greater in richer and more urban societies. At the individual level, although higher incomes tend to be reflected in greater satisfaction, an increase in the income of the social group to which an individual belongs has the opposite effect. The conflictive relationship between satisfaction and income has implications for political economy. In particular, it suggests a simple mechanism for explaining various characteristic traits of economic and social populism.
Subjects: 
Income
Quality of Life
GDP
Growth
Latin America
JEL: 
D63
E61
I31
O21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
188.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.