EconStor >
Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institut (WSI), Hans-Böckler-Stiftung >
WSI-Diskussionspapiere, Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institut, Hans-Böckler-Stiftung >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50460
  
Title:Institutions and macroeconomic performance: Central bank independence, labour market institutions and the perspectives for inflation and employment in the European Monetary Union PDF Logo
Authors:Hein, Eckhard
Issue Date:2001
Series/Report no.:WSI-Diskussionspapier 95
Abstract:Starting from a Post-Keynesian model in which employment is determined by effective demand and the NAIRU is viewed as a limit to employment, enforced by monetary policy reacting upon conflict inflation, the effects of central bank independence and labour market institutions on macroeconomic performance are considered and the perspectives for employment and inflation in the European Monetary Union are discussed. Central bank independence seems to be associated with stable prices and to prevent the rate of unemployment from falling below the NAIRU. But price stability also depends on labour market institutions. Horizontally and vertically co-ordinated wage bargaining allows for a considerable reduction of the NAIRU and hence of the real costs of price stability. Therefore, the perspectives for employment and inflation in the European Monetary Union depend on the development of the degree of co-ordination of wage bargaining and on the monetary strategy chosen by the independent European Central Bank. Different scenarios derived from these determinants are finally discussed.
JEL:E24
E58
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:WSI-Diskussionspapiere, Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institut, Hans-Böckler-Stiftung

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
332113957.pdf142.96 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50460

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.