EconStor >
Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich >
KOF Konjunkturforschungsstelle, ETH Zürich >
KOF Working Papers, KOF Konjunkturforschungsstelle, ETH Zürich >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50364
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBolli, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarsi, Mehdien_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-05en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-06T15:40:37Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-06T15:40:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.pidoi:10.3929/ethz-a-006435741en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/50364-
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes the labor productivity of Swiss university departments between 1995 and 2007. Using a parametric input distance function we estimate and decompose the Malmquist productivity indexes in line with Fuentes et al. (2001) and Atkinson et al. (2003). By contrast to those studies, this paper proposes a panel data specification to account for unobserved heterogeneity across production units. The adopted model is a mixed-effects model with department fixed effects as well as random coefficients for time variables. We also use an autoregressive stochastic term to model inefficiency shocks while allowing for gradual improvement of persistent inefficiencies. The results indicate a negative trend in overall productivity measured by Malmquist index, particularly after 2002, with an average productivity decline of about one percent per year. A major part of this productivity decline coincides with the recent developments in Switzerland's higher education system following the adoption of the Bologna agreement. However, the results do not provide any evidence of statistically significant relationship between productivity and reforms. Our decomposition analysis suggests that the observed productivity decline could be contributed to technical regress but also to a rising inefficiency with a relatively high level of persistence. The results also point to various patterns across different fields. In particular, economics and business departments and law schools show the lowest performance, whereas science departments stand out as an exception with productivity improvement.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherKOF Zürichen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKOF working papers // KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich 278en_US
dc.subject.jelC23en_US
dc.subject.jelD24en_US
dc.subject.jelI23en_US
dc.subject.jelJ24en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordSwiss Universitiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordParametric Distance Functionen_US
dc.subject.keywordHeterogeneityen_US
dc.subject.keywordMalmquist Indexen_US
dc.subject.keywordDecompositionen_US
dc.subject.keywordAutocorrelationen_US
dc.titleThe dynamics of labor productivity in Swiss universitiesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn667701036en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:KOF Working Papers, KOF Konjunkturforschungsstelle, ETH Zürich

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
667701036.pdf243.92 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.