EconStor >
Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich >
KOF Konjunkturforschungsstelle, ETH Zürich >
KOF Working Papers, KOF Konjunkturforschungsstelle, ETH Zürich >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50324
  
Title:Are new donors different? Comparing the allocation of bilateral aid between non-DAC and DAC donor countries PDF Logo
Authors:Dreher, Axel
Nunnenkamp, Peter
Thiele, Rainer
Issue Date:2010
Series/Report no.:KOF working papers // KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich 255
Abstract:Major DAC donors are widely criticized for weak targeting of aid, selfish aid motives and insufficient coordination. The emergence of an increasing number of new donors may further complicate the coordination of international aid efforts. On the other hand, new donors (many of which were aid recipients until recently) may have competitive advantages in allocating aid according to need and merit. Project-level data on aid by new donors, as collected by the PLAID initiative, allow for empirical analyses comparing the allocation behavior of new versus old donors. We employ Probit and Tobit models and test for significant differences in the distribution of aid by new and old donors across recipient countries. We find that new donors (i) focus on closer neighbors, (ii) care less for recipient need, (iii) exhibit a weaker bias towards badly governed countries, (iv) respond to disasters, but with fewer resources than old donors, and (v) do not pursue commercial self interest.
Subjects:aid allocation
new donors
donor motives
Probit
Tobit
JEL:F35
Persistent Identifier of the first edition:doi:10.3929/ethz-a-006070989
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des IfW
KOF Working Papers, KOF Konjunkturforschungsstelle, ETH Zürich

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
640481906.pdf330.54 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50324

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.