EconStor >
The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), Dublin >
ESRI Working Papers, The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50138
  
Title:The impact of climate policy on private car ownership in Ireland PDF Logo
Authors:Hennessy, Hugh
Tol, Richard S. J.
Issue Date:2010
Series/Report no.:ESRI working paper 342
Abstract:We construct a model of the stock of private cars in the Republic of Ireland. The model distinguishes cars by fuel, engine size and age. The modelled car stock is build up from a long history of data on sales, and calibrated to recent data on actual stock. We complement the data on the number of cars with data on fuel efficiency and distance driven which together give fuel use and emissions and the costs of purchase, ownership and use. We use the model to project the car stock from 2010 to 2025. The following results emerge. The 2009 reform of the vehicle registration and motor tax has lead to a dramatic shift from petrol to diesel cars. Fuel efficiency has improved and will improve further as a result, but because diesel cars are heavier, carbon dioxide emissions are reduced but not substantially so. The projected emissions in 2020 are roughly the same as in 2007. In a second set of simulations, we impose the government targets for electrification of transport. As all-electric vehicles are likely to displace small, efficient, and little-driven petrol cars, the effect on carbon dioxide emissions is minimal. We also consider the scrappage scheme, which has little effect as it applies to a small fraction of the car stock only.
Subjects:private car transport
Republic of Ireland
carbon dioxide emissions
scenarios
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:ESRI Working Papers, The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
632224401.pdf408.58 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50138

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.