EconStor >
Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung (WZB) >
Discussion Papers, Arbeitsgruppe Zivilgesellschaft: historisch-sozialwissenschaftliche Perspektiven, WZB >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/49755
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGosewinkel, Dieteren_US
dc.contributor.authorReichardt, Svenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T14:51:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-27T14:51:29Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/49755-
dc.description.abstractThe contributions to this paper result from a workshop on the concept of ‘civil society’ from a historical perspective, held at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin in December 2002. They document a central topic of the debate: the (explicit or implicit) regulative and normative implications of the civil society concept. Three aspects are pointed out that traditional, mostly normative, concepts of civil society tend to neglect or externalise: a possible conceptualisation of civil society by opposite terms, by locating its origin in war and violence, and by reflecting the impact of power within civil societies. All contributions are based on the idea that the problem of power and violence, whether they are opposite to civil society, or rather part (or even precondition) of it, might be an indicator to which extent conceptions of civil society in fact imply normative assumptions. Such assumptions are confronted with the ambivalence of (civil) societal reality. It is shown how the concept of civil society at the beginning of modern times emerged from opposite notions such as fanaticism and barbarianism (Colas); from violence and war (Leonhard) and, finally, which interrelations of power, enforcement, and discipline were typical for organisations in civil society at the time and today (Llanque, Sarasin, Bröckling, Priddat). This paper aims at stimulating further empirical research on the ambivalence of civil society and its “dark sides”.en_US
dc.language.isogeren_US
dc.publisherWZB Berlinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVeröffentlichung der Arbeitsgruppe „Zivilgesellschaft: historisch-sozialwissenschaftliche Perspektiven“ des Forschungsschwerpunkts Zivilgesellschaft, Konflikte und Demokratie des Wissenschaftszentrums Berlin für Sozialforschung, Discussion Paper SP IV 2004-501en_US
dc.subject.ddc300en_US
dc.titleAmbivalenzen der Zivilgesellschaft: Gegenbegriffe, Gewalt und Machten_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn60475423Xen_US
dc.description.abstracttransDie Beiträge dieses discussion papers gehen auf einen Workshop am WZB im Dezember 2002 zurück, der historische Forschungsperspektiven des Konzepts Zivilgesellschaft zum Gegenstand hatte. Sie dokumentieren einen zentralen Strang der Debatte: um die – explizit oder implizit – enthaltene regulativ-normative Tendenz in der Konzeptualisierung von Zivilgesellschaft. Hervorgehoben werden drei Aspekte, die in den geläufigen, vielfach normativ geprägten Begriffsbestimmungen von Zivilgesellschaft übergangen oder externalisiert werden: die Konzeptualisierung von Zivilgesellschaft aufgrund von Gegenbegriffen, die Ursprünge von Zivilgesellschaft in Krieg und Gewalt, schließlich die Bedeutung von Macht innerhalb von Zivilgesellschaften. Die Beiträge sind durch die Annahme verbunden, daß sich an der Frage, ob Macht und Gewalt als Gegensatz oder Teil, gegebenenfalls als Bedingung zivilgesellschaftlicher Strukturen aufgefaßt werden, Art und Grad normativer Konzeptualisierungen von Zivilgesellschaft entscheiden. Der normative Gehalt zivilgesellschaftlicher Konzeptbildung wird problematisiert, indem er mit den Ambivalenzen (zivil)gesellschaftlicher Realität konfrontiert wird. Gezeigt wird, wie seit der Frühen Neuzeit das Konzept der Zivilgesellschaft in Entgegensetzung zu den Feindprinzipien des Fanatismus und der Barbarei entwickelt wurde (Colas); inwieweit die Entstehung von Zivilgesellschaften durch Gewalt und Krieg bedingt war (Leonhard); schließlich welche Verhältnisse von Macht und Zwang, Sozial- und Selbstdisziplinierung für zivilgesellschaftliche Organisationsformen typisch waren und sind (Llanque, Sarasin, Bröckling, Priddat). Die Beiträge wollen zu weiterer, empirischer Forschung über die Ambivalenzen der Zivilgesellschaft und ihre „dunklen Seiten“ anregen.en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:wzbhis:SPIV2004501-
Appears in Collections:Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des WZB
Discussion Papers, Arbeitsgruppe Zivilgesellschaft: historisch-sozialwissenschaftliche Perspektiven, WZB

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
386036888.pdf1.14 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.