EconStor >
The University of Nottingham >
Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics (CeDEx), The University of Nottingham >
CeDEx Discussion Paper Series, The University of Nottingham >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/49654
  
Title:Two's company, three's a group: The impact of group identity and group size on in-group favouritism PDF Logo
Authors:Harris, Donna
Herrmann, Benedikt
Kontoleon, Andreas
Issue Date:2009
Series/Report no.:CeDEx discussion paper series 2009-13
Abstract:In this study, we use an allocation game to study the effects of group identity and group size on in-group favouritism when the person's own payoff is not affected by her decision. We first show that in a triadic setting when the subjects are asked to allocate a fixed amount of resource between two other anonymous individuals, the majority of the subjects choose to allocate equal amounts to both the in-group and the out-group members. Contrary to previous studies, when group identity is induced artificially by simply telling the subjects that they belong to the same 'group', it does not appear to significantly increase the amount allocated to the in-group member relative to the out-group member in a triadic setting. However, once the number of the in-group recipients is increased from one to three, the same artificial group identity triggers a sharp increase in in-group favouritism. Our results suggest that in order for favouritism to be clearly observed, not only that group identity has to be present, but also the group needs to consist of more than two members.
Subjects:favouritism
group identity
group behaviour
group size
design of laboratory experiment
JEL:D73
C92
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:CeDEx Discussion Paper Series, The University of Nottingham

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
604464037.pdf993.8 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/49654

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.