EconStor >
Centro de Economía Internacional (CEI), Buenos Aires >
Serie de Estudios del CEI, Centro de Economía Internacional (CEI) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/48597
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHoppstock, Juliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPérez Llana, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTempone, Eduardoen_US
dc.contributor.authorGalperín, Carlosen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-25T14:57:23Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-25T14:57:23Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-987-237652-9en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/48597-
dc.language.isospaen_US
dc.publisherCEI Buenos Airesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSerie de Estudios del CEI 13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleComercio y cambio climático: El camino hacia Copenhagueen_US
dc.typeResearch Reporten_US
dc.identifier.ppn612528960en_US
dc.description.abstracttransThis paper analyzes the relation between trade and climate change from a Developing country point of view regarding the next meeting of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Copenhagen in December. Trade measures related to mitigation and adaptation to the climate change are reviewed; their effects and the arguments used to justify their application are analyzed; the possible links between these measures and WTO rules are presented; the way Developing countries could face the effects of those measures is discussed, and finally the present debate at the multilateral level is summed up. Some of these measures are included in the European Union legal framework and in an Act that has so far been approved by the United States House of Representatives. These measures are also being discussed in multilateral negotiations. In this sense, the new scheme to deal with climate change that is expected to be approved in Copenhagen for an effective, complete and sustained implementation of the Convention after 2012 could include compromises that drive to measures with impacts on international trade. Furthermore, in the private sector, requisites and standards are being developed, which although voluntary in nature, will impact on trade flows. That is why it is important that all these measures be in conformity with Convention and WTO principles and rules to avoid being used as a disguised trade restriction. Besides, with the aim of minimizing the negative impacts of mitigation measures on Developing countries and fulfilling the least costly adaptation of their economies, an effective technology and financial resource transference to Developing countries from Developed countries should be assured.en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Serie de Estudios del CEI, Centro de Economía Internacional (CEI)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
612528960.pdf936.99 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.