Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/48347
Authors: 
Kinda, Somlanare Romuald
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 46
Abstract: 
This paper aims at analysing the effect of democratic institutions on environmental quality (carbon dioxide per capita, sulfure dioxide per capita) and at identifying potential channel transmissions. We use panel data from 1960 to 2008 in 122 developing and developed countries and modern econometric methods. The results are as follows: Firstly, we show that democratic institutions have opposite effects on environment quality: a positive direct effect on environment quality and a negative indirect effect through investments and income inequality. Indeed, democratic institutions attract investments that hurt environment quality. Moreover, as democratic institutions reduce income inequality, they also damage environment. Secondly, we find that the direct negative effect of democratic institutions is higher for local pollutant (SO2) than for global pollutant (CO2). Thirdly, the nature of democratic institutions (presidential, parliamentary) is not conducive to environmental quality. Fourtly, results suggest that the direct positive effect of democratic institutions on environment quality is higher in developed countries than in developing countries. Thus, the democratic process in the first group of countries has increased their awareness for the environment protection.
Subjects: 
Democratic institutions
Air pollution
Panel data
Income inequality
Investments
JEL: 
O43
Q53
C23
D31
E22
Document Type: 
Conference Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.04 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.