EconStor >
Verein für Socialpolitik >
Ausschuss für Entwicklungsländer, Verein für Socialpolitik >
Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2011 (Berlin) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/48298
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGille, Véroniqueen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-15T14:20:50Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-15T14:20:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/48298-
dc.description.abstractEmpirical evidence of education spillovers in developing countries and rural contexts is scarce and focuses on specific channels. This paper provides evidence of such spillovers in rural India, by evaluating the overall impact of education of neighbors on farm productivity. We use cross-sectional data from the India Human Development Survey of 2005. Spatial econometric tools are used to take into account social distance between neighbors. To be sure that our definition of the neighborhood does not drive our results, we test three different definitions of neighbors. Our results show that education spillovers are substantial: one additional year in the mean level of education of neighbors increases households' farm productivity by 3%. These findings are robust to changes in specification and open the way to further research. In particular, the paper does not explore the channels through which this spillover effect happens. This paper confirms the choice of improving education in developing countries: giving a child education will certainly provide him greater revenues but it may also provide his neighbors greater revenues. It also shows the importance for policy makers of taking into account education spillovers and policies' complementarity when facing political trade-offs. This paper is one of the few to underline that education externalities do not only exist in urban contexts and that education spillovers do not only occur between workers of the manufacturing and service sectors. There are also spillovers in sectors considered as more traditional such as agriculture.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherZBW - Deutsche Zentralbibliothek für Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft Kiel und Hamburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 31en_US
dc.subject.jelD13en_US
dc.subject.jelI25en_US
dc.subject.jelO12en_US
dc.subject.jelQ12en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordEducation externalitiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordRural Indiaen_US
dc.subject.keywordFarm productivityen_US
dc.titleEducation spillovers in farm productivity: empirical evidence in rural Indiaen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn665565801-
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:gdec11:31-
Appears in Collections:Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2011 (Berlin)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
31_gille.pdf260.68 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.